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Starter Circuits

Cruiser

800 Intruder
1400 Intruder
800 Intruder
1400 Intruder

Chrome

The attached simplified schematic of the starter circuit for the VS800 is courtesy of Miss Vickie. The VS1400 schematic shows the additional Compression Release Control Unit in the circuit. Other than this additional component, both circuits are essentially identical with respect to components, interlocks, and wiring colors.

More than once have I thought I had a starter problem when in fact I forgot about one of the interlocks in the starter circuit. Before you use this procedure, run through this quick check to make sure all the interlocks and switches are in their desired state:

1. Ignition Switch ON (headlights should be on)
2. Kickstand DOWN OR Engine in Neutral (Neutral Indicator Light will be ON)
3. Kill Switch in RUN or ON
4. Clutch Lever pulled all the way in
5. Starter Button is pressed

If your Starter Motor doesn’t crank over at this point and your headlight gets very dim or go out, then you probably have a discharged battery problem or a loose battery terminal connection. If the headlight does not dim or go out and the Starter Motor does not crank, here is a test procedure to test your starter circuit switches and interlocks.

Use a voltmeter to check for 12V DC. If you don't have a voltmeter, get a very small 12V test light (only a few watts, but certainly much less than 30 watts so you don't blow fuses) with bare wires connected to it. Connect one wire to "ground" (either the negative side of the battery or to some other bare metal on the frame). Touch the other wire to the positive side of the battery (also referred to as the "hot" side) to make sure the test light works. Then start checking the other components.

When the component or interlock is "made" or "on", then you should get 12V DC on both sides of the device if it is switching the "hot" wire (the test light should burn if you touch either electrical connection of the switch while the other wire of the test light is on "ground"). If not, that is the device that is not working.

However, the Kickstand (Sidestand) Switch and Engine Neutral Switch don't switch the "hot" wire--they switch the "ground" wire. So you have to test them differently.

First of all, check that all fuses are good. Pull them out and see if any are blown. If so, replace with exact same amperage rating.

Now check the components in the starter circuit: (Note: Please refer to a Clymer Manual to determine the location of the switches, interlocks, and devices described below and where the wiring connections are for these components.)

1. Ignition switch - (This is an optional test--see #2). With one wire of the test light on "ground", touch the other wire of the test light to both electrical connections on the switch one at a time. (Refer to a Clymer Manual to see which connections on the Ignition Switch are in the starter circuit.) With the Ignition Switch "on", both switch connections should turn on the test light. If one side turns on the test light and the other does not, the switch is not working properly. If neither side turns on the test light, look for a broken wire to the Ignition Switch or a bad wiring connection.

2. Neutral Indicator Light - Is it working? If so, then the Ignition Switch AND the Neutral Engine Switch are both working properly. If not, the Sidestand Diode may be bad, fuse may be blown, Ignition Switch not working properly, Neutral Switch not working properly, or Neutral Indicator Light bulb may be burned out.

3. Sidestand Switch - I assume you will have the kickstand down, and if you have the Neutral Indicator Light ON, then you don't need this interlock. You only need to be in Neutral OR have the Kickstand down. You don't need both to start. But, you can check it by putting one wire of the test light to the "hot" or "positive" side of the battery and putting the other wire of the test light to both sides of the Sidestand Switch connections one at a time. Both sides should cause the test light to burn.

4. Kill Switch - Assuming everything is working up to this point, then with one wire of the test light on "ground", touch the other wire to both electrical connection on the switch one at at time. With the switch "on", both sides should turn on the test light. If one side turns on the test light and the other does not, then the switch is not working properly. If neither side turns on the test light, look for a broken wire to the Kill Switch or a bad wiring connection, or you may have a bad Sidestand Relay.

5. Starter Button - Assuming everything is working up to this point, then with one wire of the test light on "ground", touch the other wire to both electrical connections on the switch one at a time. With the switch pressed in, both sides should turn on the test light. If one side turns on the test light and the other does not, the switch is not working properly. If neither side turns on the test light, look for a broken wire to the Starter Button or a bad wiring connection.

6. Clutch Lever Switch - Assuming everything is working up to this point, then with one wire of the test light on "ground", touch the other wire to both electrical connections on the switch one at a time. With the clutch lever pulled all the way in and the Starter Button pushed, both sides of the switch should turn on the test light. If one side turns on the test light and the other does not, the switch is not working properly. If neither side turns on the test light, look for a broken wire to the Clutch Lever Switch or a bad wiring connection.

7. Compression Release Control Unit – (For the VS1400 only—located under the passenger’s seat.) Assuming everything is working up to this point, then with one wire of the test light on "ground", touch the other wire to pin 2 and pin 4 of the Compression Release Control Unit one at a time (while it is plugged in). With the clutch lever pulled all the way in and the Starter Button pushed, pin 2 and pin 4 should turn on the test light. If pin 2 turns on the test light and pin 4 does not, the Compression Release Control Unit is not working properly. If neither pin turns on the test light, look for a broken wire to the Compression Release Control Unit or a bad wiring connection.

This covers all of your switches and interlocks in the starter circuit. If everything is good up to here and it still doesn't crank, you may have a bad Starter Relay or a burned out Starter Motor. You can jumper around the Starter Relay to test the Starter Motor, but this is risky. (The Starter Relay is located behind the frame left-hand side cover.) BE SURE YOU ARE IN NEUTRAL, or you may "launch" the bike off the kickstand. Put a jumper wire from the red wire to the black wire on the Starter Relay momentarily to verify the Starter Motor will “crank”.

If your Starter Motor does “crank”, but the engine does not “fire”, be sure that your Ignitor Unit is plugged in (1400 only—located under rider’s seat). Also, check your spark plugs and wiring to the spark plugs, coils, and pickup coils. Refer to the Clymer Manual for complete details on the Ignition System.

This does not cover every possible potential problem, but it does cover every major component of the starter circuit. Hope this will help you. Please use this test procedure with caution. "With great power comes great responsibility."

This information Courtesy of Blackbeard From the Cafe

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